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Sunseeker Manhattan 56
Fairline Squadron 58
Ferretti 550
Princess 560
Sunseeker Portofino 53
Menorquin 160
Azimut 46
Fairline Phantom 46
Princess 440
Elan Power E42
Fairline Targa 40
Fairline Phantom 38
Jeanneau Prestige 36
Fairline Targa 34
Sessa Dorado 32
Beneteau Antares 9,80
Marco Polo 9
Damor 800
Beneteau 57
Grand Soleil 56
Sun Odyssey 54 DS
Sailing Croatia
Elan 514 Impression
Gib Sea 51
Lagoon 500
Bavaria 51 Cruiser
Beneteau 50
Bavaria 50
Bavaria 49
Sun Odyssey 52.2
Sun Odyssey 49
Grand Soleil 50
Nautitech 47
Fountain Pajot Bahia 46
Beneteau Oceanis 473
Bavaria Cruiser 46
Bavaria 46
Sun Odyssey 45.2
Bavaria 44
Dufour 455
Bavaria 44 Vision
Outremer 45
Lagoon 440
Elan 450
Salona 45
Hanse 445
Bavaria 42
Elan 434 Impression
Sun Odyssey 43
Beneteau Oceanis 423
Gib Sea 43
Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 42 i
Sun Odyssey 42.2
Lagoon 410
Grand Soleil 40
Elan 410
Beneteau Oceanis 40
Bavaria 39
Nautitech 40
Beneteau First 40.7
Sun Odyssey 39i
Elan 384 Impression
Dufour 385
Lagoon 380
Bavaria 36
Elan 37 performance
Elan 37
Salona 37
Sun Odyssey 36 i
Hanse 355
Elan 344 Impression
Beneteau Oceanis 331
Elan 340
Elan 333
Yacht Charter Croatia
Sunseeker Yacht 82
Sunseeker Predator 82
Ferretti Yacht 760
Sunseeker Manhattan 64
Azimut 68 S
Fortuna Croatia
Gulet Croatia
Fortuna Dalmata
Gulet Vito
Andi Star
Gulet Andi


USEFUL INFORMATION


ADRIATIC SEA

METEO DATA


CUISINE

- Text on this page is provided by www.croatia.hr
- source of photos, maps and illustrations is noted
below them


this map is provided by www.hr  


Geographical position
Croatia extends from the foothills of the Julian Alps in the north-west and the Pannonian Plain in the east, over the Dinara mountain range in its central region, to the Adriatic coast in the south.

Area
56,542 km2, with an additional 31,067 km2 of territorial waters.

Population
4.437.460

Capital Zagreb (779.145 inhabitants - the administrative, cultural, academic and communication centre of the country).

Length of coast:
5,835 km - including 4,058 km of island, islet and reef coastline.

Number of islands, islets and reefs

1,185. The largest islands are those of Krk and Cres. There are 67 inhabited islands.

Climate
Northern Croatia has a continental climate; Central Croatia has a semi-highland and highland climate, while the Croatian coast has a Mediterranean climate. Winter temperatures range from -1 to 30C in the continental region, -5 to 0C in the mountain region and 5 to 10C in the coastal region. Summer temperatures range from 22 to 26C in the continental region, 15 to 20C in the mountain region and 26 to 30C in the coastal region.

Population
The majority of the population are Croats. National minorities include Serbs, Moslems, Slovenes, Italians, Hungarians, Czechs, Slovaks, and others.

Official language and alphabet
Croatian language and Latin alphabet.

Religions
The majority of the population are Roman Catholics, and in addition there are a number of those of Orthodox faith, as well as Muslims, and Christians of other denominations.

USEFUL INFORMATION
Currency:
Kuna (1 Kuna = 100 Lipa). There are 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50 Lipa coins, 1, 2, 5 and 25 Kuna coins and 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500 and 1,000 Kuna banknotes.

Foreign currencies can be exchanged at banks, exchange offices, post offices and at most tourist agencies, hotels and camping grounds. Banking hours are 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. from Monday to Friday. On Saturdays banks are open until 1 p.m. In the larger cities some banks are also open on Sundays. Credit cards: Most hotels, restaurants and shops accept credit cards (American Express, Diners Club, Eurocard/Mastercard, Visa, Sport Card International). Cash dispensing machines are ubiquitous.

Electricity:
Voltage of city power grid ?220V, frequency 50HZ

Water: Tap water is potable throughout Croatia.

The telephone code for Croatia is +385.

Time zone:
GMT plus one hour in winter and GMT plus two in summer

Travel documentation:
Passport or some other internationally recognised identification document. Tourists may remain in Croatia for up to three months.

For more information:
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Croatia
Tel. 01 4569 964
Web: www.mvp.hr/mvprh-www-eng/index.html

Customs regulations:
Customs regulations of the Republic of Croatia are in line with the standards of European Union countries. Foreign currency is freely brought in and taken out of the country (up to a value of 3.000 euros); up to a value of 15.000 kn for domestic currency. More expensive professional and technical equipment should be registered at the border. Dogs and cats, accompanied by their owner, need to have an International certificate from a registered veterinarian stating that at least 15 days and not more than six months have passed since their vaccination against rabies. Tax refund for goods purchased in Croatia over 500 kuna in value with a validated "Tax cheque" at departure from the country. Information: Republic of Croatia Customs Administration (tel 01 6102 333);
Web: www.carina.hr

Purchase tax reimbursement for foreign citizens:
Tourists making purchases in Croatia (apart from petroleum derivatives) which exceed 500 Kuna per receipt may reclaim VAT ("PDV").

At point of purchase the sales person will provide on request a form PDV-P, which should be filled out and stamped, on the spot. On leaving Croatia the receipt must be verified by the Croatian Customs service. A PDV refund in Kuna can be obtained within six months, either at the same shop where the goods were purchased (in which case the tax is refunded immediately), or by posting the verified receipt back to the shop, together with the account number into which the refund should be paid. In this case the refund is dealt with within 15 days of receipt of the claim.

Medical service:
Foreign tourists do not pay for medical services if the Health Care Convention was signed between Croatia and the country they come from. Expenses of health services provided to persons coming from the countries with which the Health Care Convention was not signed are charged directly to users according to the price list. There are hospitals and clinics in all the major towns, and health centers, as well as pharmacies, in all the smaller places. For patients whose lives are in danger, there is emergency transport by air(helicopter) or sea (speadboat).

There is a network of veterinary clinics and centres in Croatia.
Information: www.veterinarstvo.hr, e-mail: veterinarstvo@zg.tel.hr

National holidays 2004.:
1 January - New Year's Day; 11 and 12 april - Easter, including Easter Monday; 1 May - Labour Day; 10 June - Corpus Christi (Movable feast); 22 June - Anti-Fascist Resistance Day; 25 June - Statehood Day; 5 August - Victory Day and National Thanksgiving Day; 15 August - Assumption; 8 October - Independence Day; 1 November - All Saints' Day; 25 and 26 December - Christmas Holidays.

Working hours:
Shops and department stores are open between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m., and on Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., or to 3 p.m. A smaller number of stores close between noon and 4 p.m. Many stores are also open on Sundays, especially in the summer, and a smaller number in the larger cities are open 24 hours a day. Public services and companies usually work from 8.30 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. from Monday to Friday.

Post and Telecommunications:
Post Offices are open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., and on Saturdays until 1 p.m. There are Post Offices in the larger cities which are open until 10 p.m. in the summer. Postage stamps are sold in Post Offices and at newsstands.
Public telephones can be used only with phone cards, which can be purchased in Post Offices and at newsstands, in hotels and tourist complexes.

Environmental protection:
Protection of the biological diversity is in conjunction with the EU regulations currently in force. The water quality of the Croatia's Adriatic Sea is of high quality for swimming and in conjunction to the EU criteria. In case of an accident or contamination of the sea, please contact the National Centre for Sea Search and Rescue on the number 9155 (free telephone), which is a part of international institutions of the same rank. In case of accidental environmental contamination on land, report it to the National Information Centre on the number 01/4814 911 For additional information about the environment: tel: 01/6106 111
Tel: 0800 200 037, Web: www.mzopu.hr

Fire prevention:
Ensure that you have done everything to prevent a fire!
Do not throw lit or flammable objects into the environment!
If you see a fire, please inform others in your proximity; report it immediately on the telephone number - 93; try to extinguish the fire till the fire-fighters arrive and in such a manner so as not to endanger yourself or others!
Take notice of signs forbidding the lighting of fires!
Take care that your parked vehicle does not obstruct accesses to the fire or roads!

Important telephone numbers:
International dialling prefix for Croatia: 385
Ambulance 94
Fire-service 93
Police 92
Assistance on the roads 987; 987@hak.hr
(If you are calling from outside of Croatia or using a mobile phone dial ++3851 987)
General information 981
Information about local and district telephone numbers 988
Information about International telephone numbers 902
Weather forecast and road conditions 060 520 520
Croatia's auto club (HAK) 01 4640 800; Internet: www.hak.hr; e-mail: info@hak.hr

CROATIAN ANGELS - unified number of tourist information for all of Croatia 062 999 999
International callers, dial: +385 62 999 999
This service is available in Croatian, English, German and Italian from the 1st of April until the 30th of October.

Radio news in foreign languages during the tourist season:
On Program 2 of Croatian radio, along with the regular news in Croatian, the Croatian Auto Club (HAK) will give traffic reports in English, German and Italian along with nautical news a number of times throughout the day.
Other than on Program 2 of Croatian radio, alternating news and traffic reports will be emitted every full hour from the following studios: Program 3 of Bavarian radio, Program 3 of Austrian radio, RAI Uno, British Virgin radio and Chezch radio. Throughout the day nautical news will be emitted in English and Croatian.

ADRIATIC SEA
Depths

The shallowest part of our sea is in Istria, where the depth does not exceed 50 metres. From Pula, the seabed mildly drops, making a long, narrow valley which extends from Zirje towards Italy which is called Jabucka kotlina. The biggest depth there is about 240 metres. From Jabucka kotlina, the bottom rises to Palagruza reef where the biggest depth is 130 metres. Towards the south, the bottom drops steeply towards the Juznojadranska dolina, where the biggest measured depth is about 1,300 metres.

Seabed
The appearance of the underwater relief is the consequence of tectonic movements, abrasion or erosion which were active several million years ago, in times when certain parts of the seabed were land or the coastal area. Uneven areas on the bottom are constantly reduced by sedimentation of detritus from the land. That process is slow, but constant.

Tides
In the Adriatic, the high and low tides have relatively small amplitudes. In the southern part, the difference is rarely above some forty centimetres, while in the northern part it is somewhat bigger, so that it comes to 1 metre in Istria and the Gulf of Trieste. In some narrow channels and bays, the high tide can grow considerably during a strong sirocco. That phenomenon is characteristic for big and deep bays of the southern Adriatic. The tides are of a mixed type, which means that their rhythm is semidiurnal during the new and full moon, and of a daily type during the first and the last quarter. Their amplitudes are very irregular.

Sea Currents
Sea currents occur under the influence of winds, the difference in pressure, temperature, and the differences in salinity. With respect to the direction, they can be horizontal or vertical. There are also bottom currents which appear as the consequence of moving of water from warmer areas to colder ones, during which the surface layer gets cold and descends towards the seabed. Currents are weakly observable in the Adriatic.The speed of currents changes in particular areas, but it also depends on time periods. The average speed of currents is about 0.5 knots, but they can also reach the speed of 4 knots.

Salinity of Sea
The total quantity of salt dissolved in one kilogram of sea water is called salinity, which is usually expressed in grams and as the permillage. The salinity of the Adriatic Sea is 38.30 per mill averagely, i.e. there is 38.30 g of salt dissolved in 1 kg of water. In the northern part, the salinity is somewhat lower than in the middle and southern part because of the influence of the Po River.

Sea Temperature
The Adriatic Sea has a very marked annual change of the surface temperature. The average annual temperature is 11C. During the winter, the sea is the coldest and the surface temperature is about 7C; very seldom, it can drop below that too. In the spring, the sea becomes warmer, and the surface temperature rises to 18C. In the summer the surface of the sea reaches a very high temperature, of up to 22 to 25C, and in the southern Adriatic and Istria up to 27C. In the Adriatic, thermoclines, i.e. parts of the water column of the same temperature, are very well distinguished. The thermocline is most evident during the summer, and, in the winter, the isothermal process arises, i.e. equaling of the temperature throughout the water column. In the summer, we can notice the first thermocline at the depth of 3 to 5 metres, the next one is at about 12 metres, and yet another one at 18 metres, while below 30 metres the temperature is mostly constant throughout the year.

Waves in the Adriatic
Waves occur primarily as the consequence of the blowing of winds. The bigger the reach, i.e. the surface across which the wind blows, the higher the waves will be. Their strength depends on the configuration and the exposure of the coast. In that way, mixing of the surface layer with water from the deep is enabled, and the interaction between the atmosphere and the sea. We distinguish the crest and the trough of a wave. The length of the wave is the distance between two troughs. Most often, heights of waves in the Adriatic are between 0.5 and 1.5 metres, and they very rarely exceed 5 metres.

METEO DATA
Climate

The climate at the Adriatic is typically a Mediterranean one, with mild rainy winters, and hot and dry summers. The air temperature changes depending on the area. Thus, summer temperatures in July will be about 34C in the northern part, while in the southern part they will rise even to 38C. In the winter, the coldest temperatures are noticed in the northern Adriatic (up to -16C), while they will not have exceeded 6C in the southern part.


Winds

this illustration is provided
by www.aci-club.hr

At the Adriatic Sea, the bora, sirocco and north-western wind blow most often.

Bora
this illustration is provided
by www.aci-club.hr
Bora (Cro.: bura) is a dry, cold downward wind blowing in bursts from the north-northeast to the east-northeast direction. The direction in which the wind blows is mostly influenced by the configuration of the shore. The strength of bora is explained by the existence of warm air over the surface of the sea, and a cold layer of air above mountain ranges in the littoral, which cause a strong streaming due to equating of the pressure. Cold air tends to fill the void which occurs due to the rising of the warm (lighter) air from the sea surface. Bora blows mostly in the winter. In the summer, it usually lasts for a day or several hours, while, in the winter, it can blow as long as 14 days.

Sirocco
Sirocco (Cro.: jugo, siroko or silok) is a warm and moist wind which blows from the direction east-southeast to south-southwest. Its consequences are high waves and rain. Sirocco is a characteristic wind for the southern Adriatic, where it blows longer and stronger than in the northern part. In the summer, it usually blows as long as 3 days, and in the winter even as long as 3 weeks. The signs of the oncoming sirocco are the calm at the sea, weak changeable winds, dimness of the horizon, the increase of the temperature and moisture, and the gradual decrease of the pressure. Waves from the direction of the southeast become bigger.

Landward Breeze
The landward breeze (Cro.: maestral, maestral, smorac) is a daily, thermic wind blowing from the direction of the northwest, and it occurs as the consequence of the difference in the speed of warming up of the land and the sea. It is present from the spring to the autumn, and, during the day, it often changes the direction of blowing. The landward breeze is more present in the southern Adriatic than in the northern Adriatic, and it starts to blow earlier there.

Stiff Breeze
The stiff breeze (Cro.: burin) is a wind blowing contrary to the landward breeze. It blows during the night from the direction of the north, north-east in the northern Adriatic, and in the southern Adriatic, from the east or south-east. It is the strongest before the dawn, and after that it stops soon.

Data About Weather
Weather forecasts are made by the State Hydrometeorological Institute, and they can be heard on VHF frequencies of coastal radio stations and harbor master's offices. They are also broadcast on FM stations or at the end of the news or within broadcasts for seamen. Harbor master's offices constantly send weather reports and warnings on their VHF operating channels, in four languages. It is possible to get forecasts with the presentation of the synoptical situation in all the marinas and harbor offices.


Nautical Radio Service and Communications Service
The whole of the Croatian coast is covered by radio communications rather well. The radio service for protection of human lives and safety of navigation is provided by Plovput from Split, through radio stations Split and Dubrovnik, which cover the southern Adriatic, and Rijeka, which covers the northern part of our sea.
According to the standards of the GMDSS system (Global Maritime Distress and Safety System), the channel for automated receipt of digitalized distress calls is the channel 70, after which the communication is transferred to the operating channel of the coastal station, i.e. a harbor master's office (16 or 10). GMDSS system has been in use since 1 st February 1999, and on the present VHF channel for distress calls, the channel 16, constant listening will be possible still for some more time.
For a direct call to a harbor master's office, the channel 10 is used.

In Croatia, there are three commercial systems of wireless telephony: mobile phone 099, Cronet 098 and VipNet 091.

CUISINE
Croatian cuisine is heterogeneous, and is therefore known as "the cuisine of regions". Its modern roots date back to Proto-Slavic and ancient periods and the differences in the selection of foodstuffs and forms of cooking are most notable between those on the mainland and those in coastal regions. Mainland cuisine is more characterized by the earlier Proto-Slavic and the more recent contacts with the more famous gastronomic orders of today - Hungarian, Viennese and Turkish - while the coastal region bears the influences of the Greek, Roman and Illyrian, as well as of the later Mediterranean cuisine - Italian and French.

A large body of books bears witness to the high level of gastronomic culture in Croatia, which in European terms dealt with food in the distant past, such as the Gazophylacium by Belostenec, a Latin-Kajkavian dictionary dating from 1740 that preceded a similar French dictionary. There is also Beletristic literature by Marulic, Hektorovic, Drzic and other writers, down to the work written by Ivan Bierling in 1813 containing recipes for the preparation of 554 various dishes (translated from the German original), and which is considered to be the first Croatian cookery book.